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I was saving this skincare secret for an upcoming beauty guide, but I think you deserve to have it right now…especially since this is the perfect time of year to try it.

It’s called the Fresh-Face Watermelon Soothing Mask.

This easy-to-make DIY remedy is a powerful tool for soothing, hydrating, and giving your skin a big boost of damage-fighting vitamins after a day in the sun…

Of course, it also helps to give your complexion a gorgeous youthful glow...so feel free to use it anytime you want to look extra radiant and refreshed.

Ingredients:

watermelon_facial

For gorgeous skin: Three common ingredients
can unlock a world of benefits!

  • ¼ cup cubed watermelon
  • ½ ripe avocado, seed and peel removed
  • 1 teaspoon honey

Instructions:

In a blender, food processor or bowl, crush the watermelon until it turns into an puree — it should almost look like juice.

Then, mash the avocado together with the honey. Add your watermelon puree and mix until the ingredients form a smooth, evenly-blended paste.

Note: If you’re doing this in a blender or food processor, you can just blend all 3 ingredients together at the same time.

Application:

application

This nourishing paste can be made in minutes,
and works for all types of skin.

Apply a thick layer of the mixture to your face and neck (you can also use it on your decolletage).

Leave on for 10-15 minutes, then rinse off thoroughly with warm (not hot) water.

Why it Works:

Watermelon is a skincare powerhouse, thanks to its high content of essential beauty-boosting nutrients:

Vitamin A — shown to boost collagen levels.1

Vitamin C — a powerful antioxidant, which helps protect against wrinkles, age spots, and sun damage.2,3

Lycopene — a micronutrient shown to help to prevent signs of photoaging4 (which include fine lines, discoloration, and uneven skin tone).

Meanwhile the avocado in this simple 3-ingredient recipe serves as an excellent source of ultra-hydrating Omega-3 fatty acids5, which help keep your skin looking youthful, smooth and radiant.6,7

As an added bonus (and this is pretty major bonus) the honey in this mask provides powerful antimicrobial8 and antibacterial9 properties — to help soothe visible redness and blemishes.

So after just one use, this mask will make your complexion will look smoother, healthier, more even, and extra radiant…

And — especially after a day spent in the sun — it’s guaranteed to make your skin feel luxuriously soft, soothed, and nourished as well.

Once you’ve had a chance to try this amazing DIY remedy, be sure to hit ‘reply’ and fill me in on your results.

After all, this is one of my favorite beauty secrets…so I can’t wait to hear about your first experience with it.

Your Beverly Hills MD,

Dr. John Layke

Sources:

1 Kafi R, Kwak H, Schumacher W et al. Improvement of Naturally Aged Skin With Vitamin A (Retinol). Arch Dermatol. 2007;143(5). doi:10.1001/archderm.143.5.606.

2 Farris P. Topical Vitamin C: A Useful Agent for Treating Photoaging and Other Dermatologic Conditions. Dermatologic Surgery. 2006;31:814-818. doi:10.1111/j.1524-4725.2005.31725.

3 Placzek M, Eberlein-König B, Przybilla B. Protective effect against sunburn in humans of combined systemic ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and d-??-tocopherol (vitamin E). Melanoma Research. 1996;6(SUPPLEMENT 1):S36. doi:10.1097/00008390-199609001-00089.

4 Stahl W, Heinrich U, Aust O, Tronnier H, Sies H. Lycopene-rich products and dietary photoprotection. Photochem Photobiol Sci. 2006;5(2):238-242. doi:10.1039/b505312a.

5 Darvin M, Zastrow L, Sterry W, Lademann J. Effect of Supplemented and Topically Applied Antioxidant Substances on Human Tissue. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2006;19(5):238-247. doi:10.1159/000093979.

6 Pieterse Z, Jerling J, Oosthuizen W et al. Substitution of high monounsaturated fatty acid avocado for mixed dietary fats during an energy-restricted diet: Effects on weight loss, serum lipids, fibrinogen, and vascular function. Nutrition. 2005;21(1):67-75. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2004.09.010.

7 McCusker MGrant-Kels J. Healing fats of the skin: the structural and immunologic roles of the ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids. Clinics in Dermatology. 2010;28(4):440-451. doi:10.1016/j.clindermatol.2010.03.020.

8 Efem SIwara C. The antimicrobial spectrum of honey and its clinical significance. Infection. 1992;20(4):227-229. doi:10.1007/bf02033065.

9 Molan PBetts J. Clinical usage of honey as a wound dressing: an update. Journal of Wound Care. 2004;13(9):353-356. doi:10.12968/jowc.2004.13.9.26708.

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About the Author

Dr. John Layke

Dr. John Layke grew up in Milwaukee, WI, where he knew from a young age that he wanted to practice medicine. After completing his undergraduate degree at Marquette University, Dr. Layke went on to attend medical school at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and trained in general surgery at the University of Illinois Metropolitan Group Hospitals in Chicago.